Rob's Poole Pottery

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Traditional Art Deco Pottery

Art Deco Gallery 1

Art Deco Gallery 1.5

Art Deco Gallery 2

Carter and Company and early Carter Stabler and Adams Gallery

Gallery 1

(Flora)

Gallery 1.5

(Fauna)

Gallery 2

(Geometric)

Gallery 3

Carter & Company and Early Carter Stabler & Adams  

From small acorns huge collections sometimes grow. At Poole Pottery itself, the first two decades of the 20th Century saw only very modest production of thrown pots, with the manufactory much more focused on the production of tiles and architectural pottery.  

The early 1920's marked a period of change and experimentation at Poole.  The production of domestic pottery began to increase in scale and importance, and by the end of the decade it was at full pelt. The pots below demonstrate some of the developments made in these early days.

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From Carter and Co. to Carter, Stabler and Adams

 

Back left to right, unglazed stoneware vase, 17.5 cm tall, stamped Carter Co Poole on an unturned base, and an unidentified decorators mark CH, 1914 to 1921; candlestick, shape number 643, 18 cm tall,  JF pattern painted by Ethel Barrett between 1922 and 1924, stamped Poole England; Green reduced lustre vase, 11cm tall, incised Carter and Co mark, 1900-1908; unglazed stoneware vase, 12 cm tall, Signed Carter Co Poole on an unturned base no other marks, 1914 to 1921; and front, bowl shape number 223, 4 cm tall, CV pattern, painted by Ethel Barrett between 1922 and 1928 stamped Carter Stabler Adams, Poole England.

 

The oldest pot above, at the back of the group, is from a range of Lustre wares developed by Owen Carter, James Radley Young and  Alfred Eason between 1900 and 1908.  

The two vases to the left and right are an examples of the unglazed ware's made from 1914 and through the years of WW1 by James Radley Young.  These "Egyptian" pots are thought to have been inspired by the  local (not Egyptian) archeological finds displayed in local museums at the time. The body is made from a course grey-brown, high fired, semi-vitrified clay used also for tile making.  They're decorated with brown oxides. They have no turned base ring and the surfaces are covered by the potter's fingernail marks, thumb prints and little bits of loose clay that have attached themselves.  These pots all date form a time before John and Truda Adams, and Harold and Phoebe Stabler joined the pottery in 1921

The two white glazed pots date from the early 1920's, and although more sophisticated in appearance, they have a similar emphasis on the "hand-made". The candlestick has a lovely naivety, the the top rim is slightly wobbly and the decoration is missing one purple dot on the far right and the little bowl has a slightly squashed base.  A bowl, identical to the one seen here, appears in a photo from October 1921of a display of Poole Pottery at Regent House in London, reproduced on page 37 of the Hayward and Atterbury Poole Pottery book. 1921 was also the year that John and Truda Adams, and Harold and Phoebe Stabler joined the company and these pots were their early productions. 

 The candlestick and bowl are made from a red earthenware clay which had been used for some time in the tile works, but was first used for throwing in 1922 and was then used almost exclusively until 1934.  Later this red earthenware would be dipped in a white clay slip (as can be seen with the small bowl) and then covered with a transparent tin glaze before been painted, but between 1922 and 1924 a grey slip was used and the candlestick is an example of this, as are the stripy pots below.

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Portuguese Stripes

Left to right,  shape number 341?, 11 cm tall, EK pattern painted by Gertie Warren between 1922 and 1924;  shape number 345, 11 cm tall, JU pattern painted by Ruth Pavely between 1922 and 1924;  shape number 534, 10 cm tall, LC pattern painted by Ethel Barrett  between 1922 and 1924; and jug, no shape number, 12.5 cm tall, indistinct painters mark 1922 to 1924: 

The Portuguese stripe patterns above all date between 1922 and 1924.  They were designed by James Radley Young a decade or so earlier, typically in blue and white, but were adapted in the 1920's by Truda Adams.  A bowl, identical to the one seen here, appears in a photo from October 1921of a display of Poole Pottery at Regent House in London, reproduced on page 37 of the Hayward and Atterbury Poole Pottery book. 

 

 

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Grey?

Back row from left to right, shape number D210, 12 cm tall vase, AH pattern painted by Anne Hatchard, 1921-22; shape number 202, 16 cm tall twin handled vase, PN pattern painted by Gertie Warren, 1922-24; and shape number D333, 14 cm tall spill vase, CG pattern unknown painters mark, 1921-22. Front from left to right, shape number 443, 7 cm tall vase, EJ pattern painted by Ruth Pavely,1922-24; shape number 839, 12 cm tall preserve jar, YV pattern painted by Truda Rivers, 1922-24; shape number 185, 9 cm tall vase, HG pattern unknown painters mark, 1921-22; shape number D353, 10 cm tall vase, EP pattern unknown painters mark, 1921-22; shape number 324, 8 cm tall jug, EU pattern painted by Vera Bridle, 1923-24; and shape number 219, 7 cm tall bowl, CB pattern, unknown painters mark, 1922-24

 

 

The vases above are more colourful than you might expect given the predominance of grey.  As noted above, these pots all predate 1924.  Some have a grey semi-stoneware body and these date between 1921 and 1922, others are made from red earthenware date between 1922 and 1924.  Similarly to the Portuguese Stripe patterns above the geometric patterns here are early examples attributed to Truda Adams and are modified only very slightly from the designs of James Radley Young a decade earlier.  More, later, examples of Truda Adams Geometric boarder designs can be seen in Gallery 2.

 

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Later unglazed wares

 

Left, shape number 979, 22.5 cm tall vase, painted by Hilda Trim, 1926-1932. Right shape number 300, 16 cm tall jug, YX pattern, unclear decorators mark, 1922-32.

 

Yet again, these pots are later and much less rustic interpretations by Truda Adams of the unglazed pots originally designed by James Radley Young.  The decoration in brown and terracotta slips is much more precise than the earlier pots.  They have clear glazed interiors, that has resisted crazing and a body what was (I think) fired at a higher temperature and is as a result relatively imperious to water, this is surprisingly usable and durable pottery.

 

 

The widget below is showing ebay listings for traditional Poole Pottery that are ending now 

 

Gallery 1

(Flora)

Gallery 1.5

(Fauna)

Gallery 2

(geometric)

 

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Started December 2008                                                                                                                                                            Last updated: 20/12/2015

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